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20121205
20121213
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environments. then you are able to deliver a new, interesting experience. you have the information that we all love, but also married that with the pipe. i hopefully -- i hope that you can create new experiences. >> from time warner, they predicted that all channels will be like hbo. subscription-based. >> people say that. >> he did not say all cards -- ala carte. >> i didn't think that he would. what that means is that people will have an anywhere anytime approach to the television device. my show is on at 7:30. i am angry with my mother because we are out shopping and if we do not get back in the next 20 minutes, i am going to mess it -- i'm going to miss it. and i am not going to have any ability to catch up to it or see it again. no child today has that experience, first of all, already. but the new dimension that is going to come into that is the devices. the ability to get to all of these other things. which is what you see people talking about software and i.t. meaning if i can speak the language of all these devices, then i can put this into all computing devices. and then you have the
great trend that we've seen ushered in by mobile and the app environment. you'll be able to see little min wets of software that are or able to deliver kind of new and intriguing experiences, taking advantage of the premium content we love, but also with the powerful information pipe that we're able to marry with that. and i hope through creative minds that will combine to create really revolutionary, new kinds of television-watching experiences. >> host: jeff bukes of time warner recently predicted that most channels in a couple years will be like hbo; subscription-based, you'll be able to watch almost a la carte. >> guest: well, people say that -- >> host: he didn't say a la carte. >> guest: i don't think that he would. [laughter] you know, that means many different things to many different people. what it means, what it means which i think is correct is that people will have a very anytime, anywhere, any device kind of approach to their television experience. you know, my life as a child of appointment television when my show was on 7:30 and i'm angry with my mother because we're ou
. but the ability to stumble on them, or to hear people talking about them and let me go into an environment and go kind of dabbling around in that? sort of like honey boo-boo and now i'm watching it. i think that's a huge part of the american television experience and i think it gets sold short when we get tech know ecstatic, taking about anytime, anywhere, any how, and americans live passivity and being able to roam around the tv jungle. >> host: also joining us is lynn standon, senior editor tell communications reports. >> guest: how important role do you think the media will play in connecting with your tv experience down the road? >> guest: that's a great question. if you think about social media, it's just conversation. television has always been about conversation. it's not always been about, that moment you're watching it. the intimate pleasure you get, the credits roll on your favorite show, you have an immediate emotional enjoyment. what do you want to do? i want to call my sister and see what she thought about the final scene. i have been doing that for 30 years. when you go to work the
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3